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Pet Permissions

from Center for Puppetry Arts

Program image

The Center for Puppetry Arts and the Atlanta Humane Society are teaming up to bring you a unique collaboration for our Distance Learning Program!

During our Distance Learning Program, students will learn all about wild animals and pets with a focus on discovering how to ask for “Pet Permissions” to pet dogs and cats. Your students will have an opportunity to create and build their very own hand puppet dog or cat to practice and reinforce their newly learned skills!

Program Rating

This program has not yet been evaluated.


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About This Program

Cost

Multipoint: $155.00
Multipoint Premium: $155.00
Point to Point: $155.00
Point to Point Premium: $140.00



Length

45 minutes


Target Audience

Education: Grade(s) Pre-K Students, Kindergarten, 1, 2Public Library: Library Patrons

Minimum participants:

5

Maximum participants:

35


Primary Disciplines

Performing Arts, Sciences, Character Education


Program Delivery Mode

Videoconference - H.323 (Polycom, Cisco/Tandberg, LifeSize, etc...)
Videoconference – Webcam/desktop (Zoom, Skype, iChat, FieldTripZoom, Vidyo, Movi/Jabber, Blue Jeans, etc...)
Zoom



Booking Information

This program is booked on demand.

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Receive this program and 9 more for one low price when you purchase the CILC Virtual Expeditions package. Learn more

For more information contact CILC at (507) 388-3672

Provider's Cancellation Policy

We will not charge for programs cancelled due to nature i.e. snow days. The full fee will be charged to sites which cancel with less than 48 hours notice.

About This Provider

Content Provider logo

 

Center for Puppetry Arts

Atlanta, GA
USA

The Center for Puppetry Arts opened to the public on September 23, 1978, when Kermit the Frog and his creator Jim Henson cut the ceremonial ribbon. The first puppetry center in the United States, today it is the largest American organization solely dedicated to the art of puppet theater.

The Center has been a leading voice in the field, and has hosted numerous conferences and festivals. In addition, the Center has been recognized both nationally and internationally as an organization for excellence. The Ford Foundation recently selected the Center as one of only 28 national organizations to be recognized for success in management and innovative programs. The prestigious Kresge Foundation awarded the Center three different grants to support its capital campaigns. The Center was also the only theater group chosen by the 1996 Olympics to participate in all four years of its arts festival program.

Contact:
Sara Burmenko
samm@norsoft.net
4048815117

Program Details

Format

1. This program begins with a welcome activity to warm students up.
2. We introduce the students to the concept of wild animals vs. pets in the home.
3. We then talk about seeing pets in our neighborhoods and at friends houses and how we need to make sure to be safe even with domesticated animals
4. We tell the students about 3 permissions that they need to get before approaching a cat or dog
5. Next we discuss how we as humans express different feelings/emotions physically and so do animals
6. Using visuals, we teach the students how to "read" cats and dogs body language and if it is safe to approach the animals.
7. We play a game testing the students knowledge of what they learned.
8. We then make a cat/dog

Objectives

Teach Students how to approach animals in a safe manner by learning the appropriate permissions to ask and being able to recognize animals body language.

Standards Alignment

National Standards

VA:CR1.1.PKA
Engage in self-directed play with materials
VA:CR1.2.PKA
Engage in self directed, creative making.
VA:CR2.1.PKA
Use a variety of art making tools
VA:CR2.2.PKA
a. Share materials with others
VA:CR2.3.PKA
Create and tell about art that communicates a story about a familiar place or object.
VA:RE.7.2.PKA
Distinguish between images and real objects.
VA:CN10.1.PKA
e. Explore
VA:CR1.1.PKA
Engage in self-directed play with materials
VA:CR1.2.PKA
Engage in self directed, creative making.
VA:CR2.1.PKA
Use a variety of art making tools
VA:CR2.2.PKA
a. Share materials with others
VA:CR2.3.PKA
Create and tell about art that communicates a story about a familiar place or object.
VA:RE.7.2.PKA
Distinguish between images and real objects.
VA:CN10.1.PKA
e. Explore
K-LS1-1.
Use observations to describe patterns of what plants and animals (including humans) need to survive. [Clarification Statement: Examples of patterns could include that animals need to take in food but plants do not; the different kinds of food needed by different types of animals; the requirement of plants to have light; and, that all living things need water.]
K-ESS3-1.
Use a model to represent the relationship between the needs of different plants and animals (including humans) and the places they live. [Clarification Statement: Examples of relationships could include that deer eat buds and leaves, therefore, they usually live in forested areas; and, grasses need sunlight so they often grow in meadows. Plants, animals, and their surroundings make up a system.]
K-2-ETS1-1 Ask questions, make observations, and gather information about a situation people want to change to define a simple problem that can be solved through the development of a new or improved object or tool.
K-2-ETS1-2 Develop a simple sketch, drawing, or physical model to illustrate how the shape of an object helps it function as needed to solve a given problem.